Concealed Carry Permits In Tennessee Is Governed By A State Constitution

Concealed Carry Permits Tennessee TN

Concealed Carry Options for WomenState constitutions generally govern the ability to obtain a Concealed Carry Weapons Permit, however, not all states require them. There are just a few states – like Arizona, Vermont, and Alaska – which include what’s called “constitutional carry” laws in their legal structure, and a permit is not required to carry a concealed firearm. There are other stipulations within constitutional carry, however, that demand that anyone carrying a concealed weapon identify it when in contact with any Peace Officer. Failure to do so can result in felony charges being filed. Make sure you know the laws in Tennessee. 

Do you know the laws where you live in Tennessee, you may be able to take advantage of the streamlined application process that exists within “Shall Issue” states. The standard approval process usually includes a background check, one or more required classes, qualification with your firearm (safety and marksmanship), and paying the required fee. Currently, Utah, Nevada, and Florida are the easiest states to obtain a Shall Issue CCW.

Concealed Carry Permits In Tennessee Are Different From Other States

While obtaining a Concealed Carry permit requires an application for most citizens, even when acquiring one, it doesn’t mean that it is free from restrictions. For instance, in Tennessee you may only be allowed to carry a revolver rather than a semi-automatic pistol, or you may only be allowed to carry a specific caliber of firearm. Additionally, you may have to undergo testing for proficiency regarding weapon safety and marksmanship, and in some instances, your CCW permissions may be limited to the county or city where the permit was issued. Where proficiency testing does occur, it usually happens on either an annual or semi-annual basis. Women and Concealed Carry

There are three types of Concealed Carry in States, Shall Issue, May Issue, and Constitutional  Carry

Although some issuers of CCWs are not as strict as others, acquiring a CCW in Tennessee may not be an easy process. There are “Shall Issue” states and “May Issue” states, ( and Constitutional Carry which do not require any permit) and if your state happens to be a “May Issue” state, then the local authorities are generally given discretion as to whether they believe it should be issued or not. However, no matter which type of issuance your state’s laws command, you will still have to go through a lengthy application process. In most locales, this means a long application requiring extensive information, some may also require a convincing letter that provides justification for your need of a Concealed Carry permit, and possible an oral interview as well. 

Find out how to obtain a CCW - CHL  in every State by clicking here; concealed carry permits 

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Article 1, Section 26 of  The Tennessee State  Constitutional Provision States: “That the citizens of this State have a right to keep and to bear arms for their common defense; but the Legislature shall have power, by law, to regulate the wearing of arms with a view to prevent crime.”

A license is required to carry a loaded handgun either openly or concealed. Such permits are issued through the Department of Safety to qualified residents 21 years or older for a 4 year term. Tennessee recognizes any valid, out-of-state permit for carrying a handgun as long as the permittee is not a resident of Tennessee.

Tennessee is not a traditional open carry state. However, Tennessee is a shall-issue state that issues a carry permit that allows both open and concealed carry.

February 2013; The year's most watched piece of gun legislation in Tennessee appears to be on the fast track to the floor of the state House of Representatives, even though both sides say serious questions remain about it. A bill that would give nearly 400,000 gun owners in Tennessee the right to carry their weapons in their vehicles anywhere they want including school and workplace parking lots could be passed soon.

April 25, 2013, Governor Bill Haslam signed a law that closed the public’s access to all information contained in any application for a handgun carry permit in Tennessee. Those records are now “confidential, not open or available for public inspection and shall not be released in any manner.”

If you are a Tennessee resident and want to carry a loaded handgun on your person or in your vehicle, you must obtain a Tennessee Handgun Carry Permit. In Shelby county alone, there are approximately 25,000 residents who are licensed to carry a handgun. It is relatively easy to obtain the license, provided you meet certain requirements and receive proper safety training. Expect to spend some money. Handgun safety courses can often cost around $100, as does the permit application fee. In addition, the cost of a weapon and ammunition can be substantial.

US Precision Defense has a free directory of Firearms instructors in Tennessee and other states located on our home page.  

2013; Tennessee is one of four states, along with Arizona, Georgia and Virginia, that recently enacted laws explicitly allowing loaded guns in bars. (Eighteen other states allow weapons in restaurants that serve alcohol.) The new measures in Tennessee and the three other states come after two landmark Supreme Court rulings that citizens have an individual right, not just in connection with a well-regulated militia, to keep a loaded handgun for home defense.

Experts say these laws represent the latest wave in the country’s gun debate, as the gun lobby seeks, state by state, to expand the realm of guns in everyday life.

Tennessee has a self-defense law based on the castle doctrine. Enacted in 2007, the law does not require a duty to retreat. It extends the right for persons to defend themselves from attacks by using physical or deadly force in any place they have a legal right to be. The law provides civil immunity for persons using physical or deadly force to protect themselves from an attacker.

While open carry is prohibited for anyone who doesn’t have a carry permit, having a permit enables persons to transport long guns, rifles or shotguns in their vehicles. The firearms can be loaded, but cannot have a shell in the chamber.

A statement from the Tennessee Sheriff’s Association: “The Sheriffs of Tennessee are strong supporters of the 2nd Amendment rights of their citizens and have taken an oath to uphold the Constitution of the State of Tennessee, the Constitution of the United States of America, and the laws and ordinances of their counties and will fulfill that oath. The Tennessee Sheriffs’ Association and the Tennessee Firearms Association co-authored the Tennessee Handgun Permit Law in May of 1994.”

2013, There are currently several firearms manufacturers in Tennessee including world renowned Barrett Firearms USA, Inc most noticeable for their .50 Cal rifles. There is also Carrier Rifle Company, Homeland Defense and Police Supply Corp, Patriot Defense Arms, Predator Custom Shop, Garrett Asher Arms, Horn Lake Arms, Coyote Creek Firearms, C & C Arms, LLC, and Spencer Rifle CO Inc.

US Precision Defense maintains a free directory of Firearms instructors, Gun smiths, Shooting Ranges, and Gun Manufacturers.