Concealed Carry Permits In Louisiana Is Governed By A State Constitution

Concealed Carry Permits Louisiana LA

Concealed Carry Options for WomenState constitutions generally govern the ability to obtain a Concealed Carry Weapons Permit, however, not all states require them. There are just a few states – like Arizona, Vermont, and Alaska – which include what’s called “constitutional carry” laws in their legal structure, and a permit is not required to carry a concealed firearm. There are other stipulations within constitutional carry, however, that demand that anyone carrying a concealed weapon identify it when in contact with any Peace Officer. Failure to do so can result in felony charges being filed. Make sure you know the laws in Louisiana. 

Do you know the laws where you live in Louisiana, you may be able to take advantage of the streamlined application process that exists within “Shall Issue” states. The standard approval process usually includes a background check, one or more required classes, qualification with your firearm (safety and marksmanship), and paying the required fee. Currently, Utah, Nevada, and Florida are the easiest states to obtain a Shall Issue CCW.

Concealed Carry Permits In Louisiana Are Different From Other States

While obtaining a Concealed Carry permit requires an application for most citizens, even when acquiring one, it doesn’t mean that it is free from restrictions. For instance, in Louisiana you may only be allowed to carry a revolver rather than a semi-automatic pistol, or you may only be allowed to carry a specific caliber of firearm. Additionally, you may have to undergo testing for proficiency regarding weapon safety and marksmanship, and in some instances, your CCW permissions may be limited to the county or city where the permit was issued. Where proficiency testing does occur, it usually happens on either an annual or semi-annual basis. Women and Concealed Carry

There are three types of Concealed Carry in States, Shall Issue, May Issue, and Constitutional  Carry

Although some issuers of CCWs are not as strict as others, acquiring a CCW in Louisiana may not be an easy process. There are “Shall Issue” states and “May Issue” states, ( and Constitutional Carry which do not require any permit) and if your state happens to be a “May Issue” state, then the local authorities are generally given discretion as to whether they believe it should be issued or not. However, no matter which type of issuance your state’s laws command, you will still have to go through a lengthy application process. In most locales, this means a long application requiring extensive information, some may also require a convincing letter that provides justification for your need of a Concealed Carry permit, and possible an oral interview as well. 

Find out how to obtain a CCW - CHL  in every State by clicking here; concealed carry permits 

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Louisiana State Constitution States: “The right of each citizen to keep and bear arms shall not be abridged, but this provision shall not prevent the passage of laws to prohibit the carrying of weapons concealed on the person.”

Louisiana is a "shall issue" state for concealed carry. The Louisiana Department of Public Safety and Corrections shall issue a concealed handgun permit to qualified applicants, after performing an NICS background check and giving the local police 10 days to provide additional information about the applicant. Open carry of firearms in Louisiana is permitted without a permit, as long as the user is of at least 18 years of age and legally able to possess a firearm under state and federal law.

Louisiana's governor signed legislation making it a crime to publish the personal information of concealed handgun permit holders following a wave of outrage by gun owners after a New York newspaper listed such data last year. Louisiana joins a growing number of states that are cutting off access to that information as a national debate rages over gun control.

The measure was one of seven gun bills Republican Governor Bobby Jindal signed into law, including a bill creating a lifetime concealed handgun permit, legislation allowing gun dealers to register people to vote at their gun stores, and bills aimed at restricting access to guns by people with mental health issues.

An attempt to let Louisiana gun makers circumvent federal gun control laws is headed to a final vote in the state Senate after getting unanimous committee approval. House Bill 45 by Rep. Joseph Lopinto would create a licensing program for guns manufactured and sold within the state, possibly taking them out of the jurisdiction of federal authorities. Lopinto, R-Metairie, has argued that because the federal government's authority to impose restrictions on guns stems from its power to regulate interstate commerce, a state-run program regulating guns that don't leave Louisiana would protect manufacturers and sellers from federal laws.

It is an unfortunate state of affairs in our county that states have to take legal action to protect their sovereignty as a state and from intrusive federal laws on interstate commerce, yet states are having to become “Legally Creative” to protect the 2nd amendment, and for that US Precision Defense applauds the state of Louisiana.

As part of the stand of the Louisiana Sheriff’s association on gun rights: WHEREAS, the Louisiana Sheriffs’ Association represents the interests of all sheriffs who are sworn to support and defend the Constitutions of the State of Louisiana and the United States; and WHEREAS, sheriffs strongly support our citizens’ protected right to bear arms under the Second Amendment and the Louisiana Sheriffs’ Association does not support any laws that deprive any citizen of the rights provided under the Louisiana and the United States Constitutions and Bill of Rights; and WHEREAS, the doctrine of judicial review grants to the United States Supreme Court and the lower courts the power to determine the constitutionality of any law and sheriffs do not possess the legal authority to interpret the constitutionality of any law.

Louisianans overwhelmingly voted for Proposition Two, an amendment to their state’s constitution that solidifies the Second Amendment in the state of Louisiana. The new law says that “the right to keep and bear arms is a fundamental right” and would require courts to apply “the highest standard” of law when and if state municipalities enact laws that act in violation of the second amendment.

On Election Day, Louisiana voters overwhelmingly backed a measure to strengthen Second Amendment rights in the state. Nearly 75 percent of voters, more than 1.3 million voted in favor of Act 784, which makes gun ownership a "fundamental right under strict scrutiny of the court." "Strict scrutiny" applies the highest standard of judicial review to any law concerning gun ownership. It typically is applied to human rights, owning a gun in Louisiana is now a "fundamental right."  

Gun control proposals put forth by President Barack Obama were met by counter-proposals in Louisiana as a state lawmaker unveiled a statewide campaign to "defend the rights of Louisiana residents to bear arms." The centerpiece of the Defend Louisiana initiative will be multiple pieces of pro-Second Amendment legislation as well as a statewide tour.

"We've done some good things to protect the Second Amendment in Louisiana, but we're not finished yet," State Rep. Jeff Thompson, R-Bossier City, said in a statement. "The solution to gun violence is not found in restricting the rights of law abiding citizens or demonizing self-defense."

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