Concealed Carry Permits In Kansas Is Governed By A State Constitution

Concealed Carry Permits Kansas KS

Concealed Carry Options for WomenState constitutions generally govern the ability to obtain a Concealed Carry Weapons Permit, however, not all states require them. There are just a few states – like Arizona, Vermont, and Alaska – which include what’s called “constitutional carry” laws in their legal structure, and a permit is not required to carry a concealed firearm. There are other stipulations within constitutional carry, however, that demand that anyone carrying a concealed weapon identify it when in contact with any Peace Officer. Failure to do so can result in felony charges being filed. Make sure you know the laws in Kansas. 

Do you know the laws where you live in Kansas, you may be able to take advantage of the streamlined application process that exists within “Shall Issue” states. The standard approval process usually includes a background check, one or more required classes, qualification with your firearm (safety and marksmanship), and paying the required fee. Currently, Utah, Nevada, and Florida are the easiest states to obtain a Shall Issue CCW.

Concealed Carry Permits In Kansas Are Different From Other States

While obtaining a Concealed Carry permit requires an application for most citizens, even when acquiring one, it doesn’t mean that it is free from restrictions. For instance, in Kansas you may only be allowed to carry a revolver rather than a semi-automatic pistol, or you may only be allowed to carry a specific caliber of firearm. Additionally, you may have to undergo testing for proficiency regarding weapon safety and marksmanship, and in some instances, your CCW permissions may be limited to the county or city where the permit was issued. Where proficiency testing does occur, it usually happens on either an annual or semi-annual basis. Women and Concealed Carry

There are three types of Concealed Carry in States, Shall Issue, May Issue, and Constitutional  Carry

Although some issuers of CCWs are not as strict as others, acquiring a CCW in Kansas may not be an easy process. There are “Shall Issue” states and “May Issue” states, ( and Constitutional Carry which do not require any permit) and if your state happens to be a “May Issue” state, then the local authorities are generally given discretion as to whether they believe it should be issued or not. However, no matter which type of issuance your state’s laws command, you will still have to go through a lengthy application process. In most locales, this means a long application requiring extensive information, some may also require a convincing letter that provides justification for your need of a Concealed Carry permit, and possible an oral interview as well. 

Find out how to obtain a CCW - CHL  in every State by clicking here; concealed carry permits 

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The State Constitution of Kansas states:  “The people have the right to bear arms for their defense and: security; but standing armies in time of peace, are dangerous to liberty, and shall not be tolerated, and the military shall be in strict subordination to the civil power.”

Despite having relatively nonrestrictive firearms laws, Kansas remained one of the few states with no provision for the concealed carry of firearms until March 2006, when the state legislature passed Senate Bill 418, "The Personal and Family Protection Act." This bill made Kansas the 47th state to permit concealed carry in some form and the 36th state with a "shall issue" policy.

Under the law, the Attorney General began granting permits to qualified applicants on January 1, 2007. Previously, Kansas had allowed only open carry of firearms, except where prohibited by local ordinance.

Tensions are flaring between U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder and Kansas over a new state law shielding guns made in the state from federal regulation. Holder recently wrote to Republican Gov. Sam Brownback, saying the new law conflicts with the U.S. Constitution by potentially putting federal authorities in a legal bind.

“Federal officers … cannot be forced to choose between the risk of a criminal prosecution by a state and the continued performance of their duties,” Holder wrote in a letter dated April 26, 2013.

Holder threatened legal action against the state, saying the federal government would do what’s necessary to prevent Kansas from interfering with agents enforcing federal law. The state is already bracing for litigation. State Attorney General Derek Schmidt has asked the Legislature for $225,000 for the next two years to defend the law. Go Kansas! A state that is willing to not only stand up for its citizen’s rights but is also willing to fight for it in the courts.

Call it a public notice, a warning sign or a mark of shame: from here on out, Kansans will know for sure when they enter a public building that has sidestepped the state’s latest firearm law.

One of the most hotly-debated pieces of legislation to come out of the 2013 legislative session, HB 2052 permits the concealed carry of handguns in public buildings – provided your local government hasn’t opted out, that is. Since Gov. Sam Brownback signed the bill into law earlier this year, government entities across the state have been wrestling with the matter, and whether to pursue a six-month exemption before the bill goes into effect July 1, 2013.

Our home page is full of information for those that support gun and 2nd amendment rights. US Precision Defense. 

Call it a public notice, a warning sign: from here on out, Kansans will know for sure when they enter a public building that has sidestepped the state’s latest firearm law. One of the most hotly-debated pieces of legislation to come out of the 2013 legislative session, HB 2052 permits the concealed carry of handguns in public buildings, provided the local government hasn’t opted out, that is.

Since Governor Sam Brownback signed the bill into law earlier this year, government entities across the state have been wrestling with the matter, and whether to pursue a six-month exemption before the bill goes into effect July 1, 2013.

House Bill 2162, will take effect on July 1, 2013, and is seen by gun rights advocates as a way to further secure the Second Amendment rights of responsible gun owners in the Sunflower State. Upon signing the bill, the governor released this statement,

I signed the bill because Kansans do not support spending taxpayer dollars on legislation limiting gun rights; Kansas is a strong pro-Second Amendment state.” In addition to banning the use of taxpayer dollars to hire lobbyists for gun control, local governments cannot create “publicity or propaganda” materials, such as “any kit, pamphlet, booklet, publication, electronic communication, radio, television or video presentation” related to gun control.

Imagine the scenario in Kansas: A federal agent attempts to arrest someone for illegally selling a machine gun. Instead, the federal agent is arrested and charged in a state court with the crime of enforcing federal gun laws. Farfetched? Not as much as you might think. An Associated Press analysis found that about four-fifths of the states now have enacted local laws that directly reject or ignore federal laws on gun control.

The recent trend began in Democratic leaning California with a 1996 medical marijuana law and has proliferated lately in Republican strongholds like Kansas, where Gov. Sam Brownback this spring became the first to sign a measure threatening felony charges against federal agents who enforce certain firearms laws in his state.

US Precision Defense is committed to supporting the 2nd amendment and gun rights, visit our political feed on our home page.