Parabellum

foreign term si vis pa·cem, pa·ra bel·lum \sē-ˈwēs-ˈpä-ˌkem ˈpä-rä-ˈbe-ˌlm\

Means "prepare for war." From a Latin maxim--si vis pacem, para bellum--"If you want peace, prepare for war." The European designation of the Luger pistol and (today more commonly) the 9mm cartridge it chambered. Parabellum MG14, a 7.92mm-calibre World War I machine gun, Pistol Parabellum or Luger P08 pistol, 7.65×21mm Parabellum, a handgun cartridge, 9×19mm Parabellum, a handgun cartridge

9mm-parabellum
9mm-parabellum

Peacemaker

Noun   (pēs′mā′kər)

Originally, a dueling pistol. In contemporary usage, a Colt Single Action Army revolver or a derivative. The Colt Single Action Army — also known as the Model P, Peacemaker, M1873, Single Action Army, SAA, and Colt .45 — is a single action revolver with a revolving cylinder holding six metallic cartridges. It was designed for the U.S. government service revolver trials of 1872 by Colt's Patent Firearms Manufacturing Company, today Colt's Manufacturing Company, and was adopted as the standard military service revolver until 1892.

Colt Peacemaker
Colt Peacemaker
Pin Gun

A heavily customized auto pistol with a muzzle extension that serves as a weight and recoil compensator. Origninally developed for bowling pin shooting, hence the name. Now universally used in action shooting sports.

Modified Pin Gun
Modified Pin Gun

Pistol

(pĭs′təl)

Originally, any firearm designed to be fired one-handed. In contemporary American usage, the term "pistol" is limited to handguns in which the barrel and chamber form a single unit, i.e., self-loaders and single shots. It is considered erroneous to apply the term "pistol" to a revolver.

However, this distinction is of fairly recent origin. Colt referred to its revolvers as "pistols" at least into the 1880's, and the British military officially designated their service revolvers as "pistols" as late as the WWII era. The origin of this word is particularly obscure. Some trace it to the Italian town of Pistoia, an early gunmaking center. Another explanation derives from a Bohemian handgun called a "pist'ala" from a Czech word for "pipe." Several other more fanciful etymologies exist.

Colt 1911 Semi-Auto Pistol
Colt 1911 Semi-Auto Pistol
Porting

May mean either lowering the ejection port of a self-loading pistol to ensure greater reliability and less damage to cases or the practice of drilling gas vents in a barrel to reduce muzzle jump. The proprietary Mag-na-port system is a well-known example of this.

Revolver Muzzle Porting
Revolver Muzzle Porting

PPC

Stands for Practical Pistol Course, a course of fire developed by the FBI that involves shooting at man-silhouettes from a variety of ranges and shooting positions. Shot competitively, usually by police. The custom heavy-barreled revolvers favored in these competitions are known as "PPC revolvers."

In the late ‘30s, in an effort to improve and make its firearms training more realistic, the FBI introduced the Practical Pistol Course (PPC). The course encompassed prone shooting at 60 yards, sitting and barricade positions at 50 yards, kneeling and barricade shooting at 25 yards, off-hand shooting at 15 yards and point shooting using the “FBI Crouch” at 7 yards. The course was timed to add an element of stress, and the targets were humanoid silhouettes instead of the traditional round bulls-eye.

FBI PPC
FBI PPC